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Rosemary Sutcliff

Eagle of the Ninth, The
Walck, 1965

Reviews:

A great book from a unique viewpoint. This was the first time I'd read about the Roman occupation of Britain from a Roman viewpoint rather than a British one, and this showed a totally new perspective. The Romans, at least the ones in Eagle, were depicted as people who loved Britain enough to make their home there, and the soldiers as civilized fighters rather than conquering barbarians. Speaking historically, the Roman legions most likely contained some of both. The mood of this book reminds me of rain and the pace is slow, yet engrossing. Even when they are running for their lives, it always seems to be in slow motion, but considering the ending, I think this is appropriate. Eagle of the Ninth tells the story of a young Roman soldier (Marcus) who is discharged from the legions after a crippling injury. After his recovery, he sets out on a quest to find out the fate of the Ninth Hispana Legion, which his father had led. The Legion had set off to quell a rebellion of the British tribes and marched off through the mists, and no one heard from them again. Marcus's goal, with the the help of his friend Esca, a freed British slave, is to find out what happened to his father's ill-fated Legion and, if possible, bring back its eagle so it could be reformed. This story is about people searching for answers to the past, and for what their future will hold, and of self-growth. -Sarah Meyers 10/99

- Sarah Meyers, 10/1/1999


In A.D. 125, a young Roman centurian must recover the infamous Ninth Legion's missing symbol of honor, the eagle standard, during the Roman Empire's occupation of Britain. Sutcliff presents an unusual blend of stirring action and poetic symbolism in an authentic story from long ago. -Amazon.com.

- Amazon.com, 10/1/1999


A great book from a unique viewpoint. This was the first time I'd read about the Roman occupation of Britain from a Roman viewpoint rather than a British one, and this showed a totally new perspective. The Romans, at least the ones in Eagle, were depicted as people who loved Britain enough to make their home there, and the soldiers as civilized fighters rather than conquering barbarians. Speaking historically, the Roman legions most likely contained some of both. The mood of this book reminds me of rain and the pace is slow, yet engrossing. Even when they are running for their lives, it always seems to be in slow motion, but considering the ending, I think this is appropriate. Eagle of the Ninth tells the story of a young Roman soldier (Marcus) who is discharged from the legions after a crippling injury. After his recovery, he sets out on a quest to find out the fate of the Ninth Hispana Legion, which his father had led. The Legion had set off to quell a rebellion of the British tribes and marched off through the mists, and no one heard from them again. Marcus's goal, with the the help of his friend Esca, a freed British slave, is to find out what happened to his father's ill-fated Legion and, if possible, bring back its eagle so it could be reformed. This story is about people searching for answers to the past, and for what their future will hold, and of self-growth. -Sarah Meyers 10/99

- Sarah Meyers, 10/1/1999

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